Labour & birth “easy and fun”?


Pic: Splash from Daily Mail UK
Wow. Just wow!

We’ve all heard about celebs such as supermodels Miranda Kerr and Gisele Bundchen talk about how breezy their births were (Gisele said of the drug-free birth of her first child in 2010; “it didn't hurt in the slightest”), but hearing the latest quotes from new mum Holly Madison literally just made me laugh so hard while taking a sip of water, that it actually came out of my nose.


Already back on the red carpet just a couple of weeks after welcoming daughter Rainbow Aurora, Holly, a former Playboy model, says her daughter's entry into the world was “easy” and “fun”.

“Even the delivery was easy - I was actually laughing as I was pushing!” she told a US magazine.



“I had an epidural, so it was fun. She made it easy on me.”
Lucky thing!


While there’s no debating the magnificent miracle that is bringing a child into this world, for many, it’s not such a laughing matter.

Even when the Doctor realised – after three hours of pushing – that my daughter was actually posterior (head facing up instead of down meaning her head was banging on my pelvis), the Doctor had to put her hands in the canal to try and turn bub to help get her out.



Even with the epidural, I felt everything. Yep, everything. And it wasn’t what I’d call fun.

Second time around, I also succumbed to an epidural after around 20 hours of labour (lucky I did as my son didn't arrive for another few hours and was 10lb (4.5kg), 56cm, and, just like his older sis, was also posterior).


Once again, the epidural was nothing I imagined (or hoped) it would be.


I thought (perhaps thanks to celebs like Kourtney Kardashian and Holly Madison) that finally caving in to have an epidural (after refusing to “give in” for so long) would mean the rest of the labour and birth experience would be pain and effort free – and that perhaps I could run a comb through my hair (which at that stage with no.1 was a matted mess that took me hours to brush out the following day with a cannula inserted in my hand) and apply some lippy in time for the grand arrival. 


But hell-to-the-no. It was still horrendous.


Perhaps my epidurals just weren’t strong enough.

Or, perhaps Doctors who look after celebs like to make sure they get the best care, and no pain, so they can go and spruik about the ‘ease of childbirth’ and give us normal ladies a false sense of hope. 

Aaaah-haaa, yes, that's it. It must be a conspiracy.

We hardly hear from celebs about their marathon labour that turned into an instrument-assisted birth that continued to turn pear shaped.
Perhaps these types should speak up more often to earn their pat on the back they deserve for surviving, not just the ones who 'sneeze' their bubs out and feel like they deserve a street parade ;-).



Either way, every woman, no matter what form of delivery, works hard to carry their bub, deliver and nurture. 



It truly is the most amazing thing in the world and that's why we've all been going back to do it over and over again (pardon the pun) for gazillions of years!



What was your experience like?

  
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/tvshowbiz/article-2297939/Holly-Madison-shows-incredible-post-pregnancy-hourglass-shape-fitter-blue-dress.html



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